Susan Callahan | Billerica MA Real Estate, Chelmsford MA Real Estate, Nashua NH Real Estate


Purchasing a home should be fun, memorable process. However, many homebuyers struggle with fears as they embark on the process of acquiring their dream homes.

Some of the most common homebuying fears include:

1. I will pay too much for a house.

Overspending on a house is a common fear among homebuyers nationwide.

If you pay too much for a house, you may struggle to afford the monthly payments for the duration of your mortgage. Perhaps even worse, your house may lose value over time. And if you eventually decide to sell your home, you may be forced to accept less than what you initially paid for it.

Ultimately, an informed homebuyer will understand the differences between a buyer's market and a seller's one. He or she will be able to determine whether a home is affordably priced and proceed accordingly.

An informed homebuyer also will know the importance of getting pre-approved for a mortgage. With a mortgage in hand, this homebuyer will understand exactly how much that he or she can spend on a house.

2. I'll wait too long to submit an offer on a residence.

If a homebuyer is uncertain about buying a particular house and waits too long to submit an offer, he or she risks missing out on this residence altogether.

Fortunately, there is a simple way to avoid this problem.

A homebuyer who knows what he or she wants to find in a dream home can narrow a home search. Then, if the homebuyer discovers a home that matches or exceeds his or her expectations, this individual can submit an offer right away.

Don't forget to submit a competitive offer, i.e. one that accounts for the needs of both a homebuyer and home seller, as well. A competitive offer will stand out from other proposals and increase a property buyer's chances of securing his or her dream residence.

3. I'll buy a home that will fail to maintain its long-term value.

What you pay for a home today is unlikely to remain the same over the course of several weeks, months or years. But a homebuyer who employs an expert home inspector can learn about a house's strengths and weaknesses and ensure a property is a viable long-term investment.

A home inspector will conduct an assessment of a house after a property seller accepts a buyer's proposal. At this point, an inspector will examine a house's interior and exterior and identify any potential issues. Lastly, a home inspector will issue a report with his or her findings, and a homebuyer will have a final opportunity to modify or rescind an offer on a house.

For homebuyers, it is important to work with a trusted home inspector – you'll be glad you did. This home inspector will go above and beyond the call of duty to evaluate a house before you finalize a home purchase.

Working with an experienced real estate agent may benefit a homebuyer too. With a top-notch real estate agent at your side, you can get the support you need to acquire a first-rate home that will maintain its value both now and in the future.



320 Nesmith Street, Lowell, MA 01852

Rental

$1,350
Price

3
Rooms
1
Beds
1
Baths
Single Level , one bedroom apartment in Belvidere section of Lowell. Brand new laminate flooring, Updated convenient galley kitchen.Good size bedroom and updated bath. Laundry in the building. Located in Story hills Condominium Complex. Easy access to major highways and downtown
Open House
No scheduled Open Houses

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We know that location matters when you’re trying to find the right home to buy, but why?  First, buying a home you like in a location that matches your needs is a sign of a solid, long-term investment. Finding the right home isn’t always the answer to your property search woes. Many times, finding a house that needs a little TLC in the right neighborhood can give you a better return on your investment than finding a move-in ready house in the wrong neighborhood. You want to think in terms of finding a home that will be easy to sell if you so choose to sell it. Most importantly, you want to feel comfortable in your home and in your surroundings. What are the signs of a good location? Below, you’ll find the most important things you should look for when searching for a home. 


Safe Neighborhood


Everyone wants a safe neighborhood, and you certainly know a sketchy neighborhood when you drive through it, but what denotes a neighborhood as “safe”? First, if you see people up and walking around a place, you know it’s a good start to finding a safe neighborhood. People who are outside, interacting with one another give a neighborhood a community feel. You will feel like your neighbors have your back in a neighborhood like this. 


Quality Schools


the better the school district is, the higher the property values in the area are. If you don’t have kids, this may not be much of an issue for you. However, if you’re thinking that you may want to sell your home anytime in the future, keep in mind that a less than reputable school district can really dip into property values. 


You Can Easily Access The Things You Need


If you can access the shops, restaurants, and other conveniences easily from your neighborhood, that’s the sign of a good location. No one wants to have to drive 45 minutes in order to get to the grocery store. Many people who are looking for homes like to be in or very close to the action and have easy access to the things they need. Think in terms of convenience when it comes to location. 


A View And Nature


A home with a view is always a sign of a great location. whether you’re near the water or near the mountains, it’s nice to have something scenic and peaceful near your home to enjoy. Property values near the water are also always a bit higher than those further inland.


Transportation    


Access to public transportation is key in many neighborhoods. You want to be able to easily get to and from where you need to go without waiting around. If the area is more suburban or rural, access to freeways and main roads is key. Adding precious time to your commutes is never pleasant. Many times location and commute times come down to a simple matter of balance and planning when searching for a property.        


There are so many factors that go into finding and securing the financing to buy a home.   While lenders require quite a bit of information for you to get a loan, you still need to be aware of your own financial picture. Even if you’re pre-approved for a certain amount of money to buy a home, you still need to dig into your finances a bit deeper than a lender would. The bottom line is that you can't rely solely on a lender to tell you how much you can afford for a monthly payment on a home. Even if you’re approved to borrow the maximum amount of money for your finances to buy a home, it doesn’t mean that you actually should use that amount. There are so many other real world things that you need to consider outside of the basic numbers that are plugged into a mortgage formula.   


Run Your Own Numbers


It’s important to sit down and do your own budget when you’re getting ready to buy a home. You have plenty of monthly expenses including student loan debt, car payments, utility bills, and more. Don’t forget that you need to eat too! Think about what your lifestyle is like. How much do you spend on food? Do you go out to the movies often or spend a regular amount of cash on clothing? Even if you plan to make adjustments to these habits when buying a home, you’ll want to think honestly about all of your needs and spending habits before signing on to buy a home. 


Now, you’ll know what your true monthly costs are. Be sure to include things like home insurance, property taxes, monthly utilities, and any other personal monthly expenses in this budget. If you plan to put down a lower amount on the home, you’ll also need to include additional insurance costs like private mortgage insurance (PMI).


The magic number that you should remember when it comes to housing costs is 30%. This is the percentage of your monthly income that you should plan to spend on housing. Realistically, this could make your budget tight so this is often thought of as a maximum percentage. By law, a lender can’t approve a mortgage that would take up more than 35% of your monthly income. Some lenders have even stricter requirements such as not allowing a borrower to have a mortgage that would be more than 28% of monthly income. This is where the debt-to-income ratio comes into play.


As you can see, it’s important to take an earnest look at your finances to avoid larger money issues when you buy a home.  



There's a misconception many home sellers have that may be causing them to miss out on opportunities to have their house sell more quickly. Perhaps you're among them.

If you believe your home does not need to be staged, neatly organized, and thoroughly cleaned well in advance of the first scheduled showing, then you're overlooking one crucial step in the marketing process: having professional quality photographs taken of your home -- inside and out -- and posted online to make your listing more enticing!

Unless you happen to be an exceptionally good photographer with professional equipment, you probably won't be able to get the optimal results needed to show off your home and attract buyers. Not only will those photographs be the first impression of your home that many buyers are exposed to, but it may end up being the only impression they come away with. If prospects don't like what they see online, there's no chance they'll move on to the next step, which would be scheduling an in-person visit. That's why it's so important that the photos your agent uploads to the Multiple Listing Service (MLS) depict your home in the most favorable way.

Online photographs can work either for or against you, depending on the quality of the photos and the condition of your home and property. Ideally, you should have photos taken of virtually every nook and cranny of your home -- with the exception of areas you want to underplay. Only the best ones would be used, of course. Views of your front yard, backyard, and sometimes even an aerial view can help give buyers the perspective they're looking for.

The good news is that most real estate agents work with one or more professional photographers who make it their business to take photos that are properly lit, effectively cropped, and well composed. Experienced real estate photographers can quickly identify the most advantageous angles from which to take photos, capturing the best view of your rooms, your yard, and other property highlights.

While they might occasionally make a few adjustments to the placement of furniture, pillows, or other decor, their main objective is to snap photos that will inspire prospective buyers to envision the beauty, the charm, and the many possibilities of your home. In addition to making sure the photos are crystal clear, well lit, and visually appealing, photographers also aim to make your home look as spacious and welcoming as possible. While they can't perform miracles, a talented photographer will typically find creative ways to bring out the best qualities in any home.

Your real estate agent can also give you valuable tips on enhancing your property's curb appeal, minimizing clutter, and adding simple touches -- both inside and out -- to maximize the warmth and appeal of your home for sale.




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